Zack Snyder comments on Batman vs Superman live on Vero

The live took place the week the film completed four years of release

Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice had its world premiere on March 25, 2016, and that Sunday, (29), director Zack Snyder made a live review when commenting on a movie scene, for his profile on the social network Vero.

Snyder, seated in a movie theater, play the film to ‘shoot’ and reported several details of the production to the audience, who interacted with comments on the broadcast chat.

For example, about some movie locations (Detroit, Bora Bora, Michigan, and Mexico), and some comics and movies that inspired a story (Action Comics 1, Wonder Woman 1, Batman 1, Detective Comics 1, The Dark Night and Watchmen).

A Deborah Snyder product featured a few moments from the broadcast, but then came out.

Seeing it as images of a long big screen in front of him, and surrounded by books with a storyboard of films, he spoke of the role of each character.

On Superman, played by Henry Cavill, the director commented on points as an inspiration of the version addressed to the character, released as metaphors that link or hero of Jesus Christ and Excalibur, and the moral dilemmas of the iconic Kryptonian.

The Superman Version

Snyder said that his version of Superman faces a more complicated reality and morality than in 1938, (in reference to the year Superman had his first comic published), but he is still just an optimistic “guy”, who believes in fact and is trying to do what’s right.

“That’s why I love Superman so much, that’s why even in the darkest moments, he has this optimism about humanity.”

Zack also commented on Superman’s pain and crying, in the Capitol explosion scene, where he is “physically” helping to run like injured people, but emotionally does not exist, (after being so misinterpreted by people and witness the tragedy without being able to prevent it).

Examining the moment when Clark “reunited” with Jonathan Kent, the director commented that every hero was internalized in Fortress of Solitude and reconnected with his essence. A simple “conversation” with the father brings up what he already knows: “deep down, you do the best you can”.

Metaphors

The director explained metaphors used in some scenes, as compared to Jesus Christ, because Superman is seen as a savior and for everything or what he can do that is extraordinary.

When talking about a kryptonite release, used in the death scene of Apocalypse and Superman, Zack brings another metaphor, quoting Excalibur (a legendary sword of King Arthur).

The character that Superman gives to death, echoed across the globe and meaning for all cultures and religions, brings the sense of collectivity and “wakes up” like maternal boxes.

For Bruce Wayne, it is either regret, readings learned, a hope and an understanding of something “if broken”, but at the same time Snyder says that:

“He (Bruce) can honor what Superman is, and use Superman’s legacy for something new.”

In the end, the director said he couldn’t ask for more from the whole team, which was just fantastic, and thanked the fans for continuing to love Batman vs Superman like him.

And for those who did not attend, it is obvious that when they arrive at the speech “Do you bleed?” Snyder, (people like us), says: “Iconic!”

Even after four years, the BvS remains a landmark in superhero films. Although it did not reach a box office expected by the studios (US $ 873 million), it is one of the most talked-about films of the genre of all time.

The plot and approach given to the heroes generate a lot of controversies, but you can bring the dilemmas experienced by them to “our” time (considering that their first stories were more than 70 years old).

The extended version of the film is 181 minutes (30 minutes longer than the version shown in theaters), and no matter how much time passes, it will always be a great entertainment option!

Tell us what you think of Batman vs. Superman, with Superman of the century Henry Cavill?

Fabiana Franzosi -Portal Henry Cavill
Fontes Zack Snyder – Vero e Observatório do Cinema